Facebook buys WhatsApp in $19 billion deal

Facebook buys WhatsApp in $19 billion deal.

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Facebook buys WhatsApp in $19 billion deal


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http://www.dnaindia.com/scitech/report-facebook-buys-whatsapp-in-19-billion-deal-1963578
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Facebook buys WhatsApp in $19 billion deal
Thursday, February 20, 2014 – 08:25 IST | Agency: PTI

Mark Zuckerberg.

Social media giant Facebook buys mobile messaging company WhatsApp for 19 billion dollars in a cash and stock deal, the largest acquisition by the Mark Zuckerberg-led firm so far that will give it a stronghold in the market for messaging.

The whopping acquisition price includes USD 4 billion in cash, about USD 12 billion worth of Facebook shares and USD 3 billion in restricted stock units to be granted to WhatsApp’s founders and employees that will vest over four years following the closing of the deal.

Under the agreement, WhatsApp co-founder and CEO Jan Koum will join Facebook Board of Directors. Facebook said the acquisition will not impact the WhatsApp’s brand, which will be maintained and the company’s headquarters will remain in California’s Mountain View.

WhatsApp’s core messaging product and Facebook’s existing messenger app will continue to operate as standalone applications. “WhatsApp is on a path to connect one billion people. The services that reach that milestone are all incredibly valuable,” Zuckerberg said.

“I’ve known Jan for a long time and I’m excited to partner with him and his team to make the world more open and connected.” WhatsApp, which will continue to operate independently, has built a leading and rapidly growing real-time mobile messaging service with over 450 million people using the service each month. Of this number, 70 per cent users are active on a given day. The messaging volume of WhatsApp is approaching the entire global telecom SMS volume and the company is currently adding more than one million new registered users per day.

“WhatsApp’s extremely high user engagement and rapid growth are driven by the simple, powerful and instantaneous messaging capabilities we provide. We’re excited and honored to partner with Mark and Facebook as we continue to bring our product to more people around the world,” Koum added. Koum co-founded WhatsApp in 2009 with Brian Acton, both former Yahoo executives.

WhatsApp had received about USD 10 million in funding two years after it was founded. Facebook’s most recent acquisition attempt failed when Zuckerberg tried to acquire SnapChat last year for a reported three billion dollars but SnapChat turned down the offer.

In a blog post, Koum said he would not have agreed to the partnership with Facebook if WhatsApp would have had to “compromise” on the core principles of the company. The deal would give WhatsApp the flexibility to grow and expand and noted that users of the service will not experience any change in usage.

Google acquires audio ID startup SlickLogin

Amazing Technology !!

Alex Rojas Riva - Marketing Online

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Google acquires audio ID startup SlickLogin

Warwick Ashford Monday 17 February 2014 08:58

Google has acquired Israeli startup SlickLogin that has developed technology that enables online services to authenticate a user with sound waves.

SlickLogin confirmed the acquisition on its website but did not provide any financial details of the deal.

Security-iStock_Henrik5000.jpg

Online services that use SlickLogin play a unique sound inaudible to humans over a user’s computer speakers which is picked up by the SlickLogin smartphone app and sent back to confirm identity.

SlickLogin’s technology uses a combination of protocols, including Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and QR to verify that a user’s smartphone is in the same location as the computer being used to access to the online service.

The technology’s creators claim it offers “military-grade” security as everything is heavily encrypted and the sound transmissions will work only with the user’s smartphone at a particular moment in time.

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Google acquires audio ID startup SlickLogin

News

Google acquires audio ID startup SlickLogin

Warwick Ashford Monday 17 February 2014 08:58

Google has acquired Israeli startup SlickLogin that has developed technology that enables online services to authenticate a user with sound waves.

SlickLogin confirmed the acquisition on its website but did not provide any financial details of the deal.

Security-iStock_Henrik5000.jpg

Online services that use SlickLogin play a unique sound inaudible to humans over a user’s computer speakers which is picked up by the SlickLogin smartphone app and sent back to confirm identity.

SlickLogin’s technology uses a combination of protocols, including Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and QR to verify that a user’s smartphone is in the same location as the computer being used to access to the online service.

The technology’s creators claim it offers “military-grade” security as everything is heavily encrypted and the sound transmissions will work only with the user’s smartphone at a particular moment in time.

According to the firm’s website, SlickLogin’s three founders are recent graduates of the Israeli defence force’s elite cyber security unit, and have more than six years’ experience working on cutting-edge information security projects.

The technology can be used either as a replacement for a password or as an additional security layer to enable two-factor authentication.

Google was one of the first online firms to offer two-factor authentication to users, with several others following suit in light of several high-profile leaks of usernames and passwords.

Most two-factor authentication systems in use rely on one time pass cards sent via text message or codes generated by tokens or other special gadgets.

However, text-based systems are vulnerable because if hackers compromise accounts they can change the mobile number set to receive the codes.

SlickLogin eliminates this vulnerability and does not require users to carry around a separate gadget for generating codes as used by some UK banks.  

Some analysts expect Google to use the technology to enable two-factor authentication for Android devices and all Google services.

The acquisition is consistent with Google’s goal to enable easier, more-secure online authentication.

In October 2013, Google confirmed that it is planning a two-factor authentication token, and the firm is also a member of the  Fast IDentity Online (Fido) Alliance.

The alliance is an open industry consortium set up to develop standards for simpler, stronger authentication and recently published draft technical specifications for a new authentication protocol.

The Online Security Transaction Protocol could eliminate the use of passwords in the future by enabling the interoperability of a variety of multi-factor identity checks.

These include include biometrics, Trusted Platform Modules (TPMs), USB security tokens, embedded secure elements (eSEs) and smart cards.

 

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Better Safe Than Sorry: Tips to Protect Your Mobile Device at Sochi.

 

 

February 7, 2014

Better Safe Than Sorry: Tips to Protect Your Mobile Device at Sochi

By Marc Rogers 0 Comments

It has taken 7 years and an unprecedented $51 billion dollars to prepare Sochi, Russia’s traditional summertime seaside resort for the 2014 Winter Olympics. Russia is deploying the biggest security force in the games’ history and the U.S. and other countries are also sending security teams of their own. Despite these precautions, Russia’s cybercriminals are already preparing for the Sochi Olympics.

Cybercriminals have a history of exploiting global high profile events. The Beijing Olympics is a great example where cybercriminals created fake websites that mimicked the legitimate event. Russian cybercriminals, in particular, are known to be highly experienced at this, and consequently US CERT is already issuing warnings about what to expect.

NBC’s news investigation into Russian malware at Sochi claimed that Sochi visitors would be targeted and their devices would likely be compromised within a matter of hours. Our perspective is slightly different. While it’s true Russia is a high risk environment, this doesn’t mean that you will be hacked the moment you step off the plane. In fact by just following a few common sense recommendations we believe that everything will be OK.

EOY_Lookout_Report

 

In 2013, we found that  62.91% of Lookout devices in Russia encountered mobile malware. That’s double China’s encounter rate of 28.45% and an almost 15 times greater chance of encountering malware than in the US (4.22%).

People are much more likely to consume what they feel is relevant to them, therefore Russian malware writers use advertisements dressed to match current events to lure victims. As a result, Russian malware authors rapidly adapt to major events that are likely to have a large audience, dressing their malware with images and text to make it appear relevant to that event. Finally, they use search engine optimization (SEO) tricks to ensure their malware comes back in the top results on any query for the targeted event.

How to Stay Safe?

Thankfully, this means there is an easy way to stay safe. Remember that malware encounter rate of 4.22% for the US? The single biggest factor behind this is that U.S. device owners predominantly download their apps from the Google Play store, while Russian users commonly sideload their apps from forums such as “4pda.ru” after allowing untrusted sources on their devices. So if you are going to the Sochi games, try not to worry too much, and instead make sure you follow these simple steps in order to stay safe.

  1. Prevent unauthorized third parties from tampering with your device. Don’t leave your device unattended, and ensure you have a strong PIN code on your device’s lock screen. A passcode is your first line of defense against unauthorized parties should your device fall into the wrong hands. Consider enabling “Device Encryption” as an additional layer of defense for your data.
  2. Download a mobile security app. Ensure you use a security application such as Lookout Mobile Security. Lookout will protect against mobile threats, such as malware and spyware, and help you recover your device if lost or stolen.
  3. Don’t download and install applications from untrusted sites. Make sure the “Unknown Sources” setting remains unchecked to block any attempts to do so.
  4. Don’t open suspicious attachments or install suspicious files. If you see a strange file appear on your device or an application prompts you to install it, delete it and don’t install. Likewise, do not open attachments in suspicious emails. If in doubt, check with the person that sent the attachment to ensure it is genuine.
  5. Only use Wi-Fi that you trust. If there is any doubt use 3G/4G Internet instead.
  6. Don’t connect your device to unknown computers. Only use your own charger or a charger that you trust to prevent a fake charger from attacking your device or attempting to steal your data.
  7. Only unlock your bootloader and jailbreak your device if you fully understand the risks. Take extra precaution when taking a device with an unlocked bootloader to a high risk country.

Webcam safety with Jacqueline Jossa

Webcam safety with Jacqueline Jossa

 


WEBWISE
KNOWLEDGE & LEARNING BETA

5 February 2014 Last updated at 16:00

Webcam safety with Jacqueline Jossa

Jacqueline Jossa’s guide to webcam safety:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/webwise/0/25812110

Webcams make it possible for us to chat face to face with friends and family wherever we, or they, may be.
You could be in the next room to the other person or on the other side of the world, but the webcam allows you to talk as if you were face to face.

Now there are some risks attached to webcam use, but by following a few simple steps you can reduce the chances that you’ll come to harm.

What is ‘Ratting’?

Hackers are able to gain access to a victim’s computers using a piece of malicious software (malware) called a Remote-Access Trojan (Rat) which infects the victim’s computer or device with a virus. These are sometimes referred to more generally as remote access tools.
Many of these ‘Rats’ now include a function allowing a hacker to access the victim’s webcam without their knowledge.

How secure is your webcam?

So how does a hacker get a virus into your computer or device? One way they can do this is by sending you an email with a link. If you receive an email from a stranger, think before clicking on a link or an attachment.

The risk of having your webcam hacked is also higher if you don’t have up-to-date anti-virus software on your computer and other software is not kept up-to-date. So make sure you have the latest versions of security software on all your devices including tablets and smartphones.

Where is your webcam?

It is important to avoid putting webcams in private areas such as bedrooms. When webcams are not in use don’t forget to unplug them, cover the lens or point it at a blank wall.

Making friends online

Continue reading the main story

Think before you cam

Jacqueline Jossa at her laptop

More common-sense tips can be found in the Childnet video and webcam chat guides

If you use your webcam to communicate with people you meet online, it is important to consider how well you know them. If you are having a private conversation are you sure they are the only person who can see you?

Also consider whether there’s a chance that they could be recording what you are saying or doing – you might not want them to post a video of your chat on a social network or share it using their mobile phone.
Remember, once it is out there you may never be able to delete all copies of it. It is against the law for someone to intrude on your privacy in this way and offenders can be prosecuted under the Computer Misuse Act.